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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 3,866 (some duplicates have been removed)
when herichard nixon proposed universal healthcare. that's the irony. boehner is actually have --that he should
for competition for food. >>> the university of michigans alumni were there to salute the wolverines. there are 300 wolverines left in the wild and just like the polar bear, they are losing habitat to global warming. are you upset the real jackman was not there for this? >> i am just upset they did not look like what i thought they would look like. >>> that's going to do it for
the university of mountain neighborhood. could you first call item 72 in order for us to sit as a committee. >> item 72 is a motion to sit public hearing on the urgency ordinance approving an interim zoning moratorium on constitutional changes of use in the university mountain neighborhood. >> we first have to pass a motion and order to allow us to sit at this moment. let me ask if there are any members of the public that wish to speak in public comment. this is only about whether we should have a hearing today so if you want to talk about the item itself, we'll have please step up. needs to be to that matter. >> sure. i think if the united states of america from the federal level, state level, [inaudible] every city, if the united states of america, the government does have such wealthy, wealthy, wealthy potential for every citizen [inaudible] benefit. america is truly wealthy if it can a allow each citizen [inaudible]. thank you. >> thank you. are there any other members of the public who wish to speak on whether we should sit. if we could take this motion same house same call. without o
as it stands, the current zoning for the university mound ladies home, which is a residential care facility to anything other than a residential care facility. because this change would wipe out a legacy and alter the character of this neighborhood, i wanted to take the step to make sure that we as a city have had the opportunity to study the effects on the neighborhood and work with the community and understand how the changes like the one of this board of directors is proposing would impact this neighborhood. the purpose is to provide the planning department the opportunity to study this neighborhood and all its institutional uses. in september the planning department will present findings regarding zoning in this neighborhood and propose ideas to address concerns and potential outcomes arising from the potential closure. the controls that are before you extends beyond the site of the lum. university mound ladies home. it is a temporary measure to allow the study of neighborhood to ensure balance of uses. i'd like to address my concern that a for profit entity without substantial
. ♪ >> the university of michigan alumni were there to salute the wolverines. there are only about 300 of them left in the wild. >> up next on the abc7 saturday morning news, a drill for local firefighters and police. why it is so critical to protecting bay area students. >>> and a mystery in the
more. colleges and universities say that these refuses benefit college athletes and their student bodies at large. but i think we have to consider whether the lure of such riches could corrupt the basic mission of athletic programs. winning teams get higher payouts than losing teams which creates a strong incentive to win. an incentive which land grant public universities and others are more than happy to follow and win at any cost. much of the money is often funneled right back into the sports programs in the form of multimillion-dollar coaching facilities and state of the art facilities many of it paid for by the taxpayerses to perpetuate the cycle of winning. i think somewhere in my reading here, about $48 million of all the $900 million that ncaa gets from, you know, their broadcasting, march madness and all the rest of it, a very small portion goes specifically to academics. but even that's hard to figure. because nobody has the figures. mr. emmert works for them. they make the decisions. he carries out what they want. and, yet the subject of discussion is
of the universe. then a congressional hearing on the search for extreftial life. columbia professor brian greene is author of the book "fabric of the koss mows, hidden reality and universe." walter isaacson recently talked to him about the origins of the universe and latest breakthroughs in physics research. his is 25 minutes. >> brian greene has written "fabric of the universe," i mean fabric of koss months -- cosmos," which i love and hidden reality, trio of books that deal with multiversus, fabric of commose, relativity. we're supposed to in 18 mings give you the whole story of thes could mows. let's begin in the beginning. how did it begin? >> how did it begin? good question. we don't know. it is an idea called inflationarry cosmology, which tries to answer a refind version of a very how did it begin, what was it that caused space to start swelling in the first place? we believe the universe is expanding, observations support that. what got the expansion started? the infligsarry theory said gravity itself is the culprit. even though the gravity we're familiar with in everyday life is attract
information. when i explored university mount ladies home as a possible placement for what i was led to believe would be my mother's final care facility, it has since become quite apparent that the board now has plans to quickly sell the building, turning the senior facility into a private school. have there been financial records kept that have been kept more easily, i would have considered other residential care facilities to avoid having to move my mother a second time this late in her life. it is a well known fact seniors have frequent difficulty with major life changes. clinical literature suggests that moving to another facility is one of the greatest stressors for all people and much more for seniors. the last few weeks my mother ha expressed increasingly more anxiety about her move and how she'll get her things together. ~ i would additionally like to state my mother and other residents have formed deep relationships and which would unfortunately be severed if she were forced to move. i would like to believe that we are a society that treasures our seniors. the best s
to hear your comments and concerns in regard to the closure of the university mount as well as i was surprise today hear what the mayor's office did. and what director mcfadden and her office did. i'd like to comment on what director mcfadden said about san franciscans being able to retire and live their life out in san francisco. my mother, when she married my dad, moved into the bayview district in 1944. my dad had lived in that house since 1928. my dad was at university mount before he passed away and because of the level of care there was so good we brought our mother there. we went to university mount first of all because of the convenience and the cost. everything else in san francisco is prohibitively expensive. we stayed because of the level of care provided by the university mount. it isn't quite university mount ladies home for nothing. it is a home. ~ isn't called we're one of the families that had to relocate our mother. it did not go well. mom still wants to go home. she's not in san francisco any more. we could not find another facility in san francisco. i think it'
? we investigate some questionable university spending and decisions and why following our reports the chancellor is just now taking action. >>> how can a driver still have a license? >> i would have to look into the specifics. >> some city cab drivers racking up traffic violations but still driving you around. we go undercover to expose bad drivers and why the agency in charge hasn't taken action. >> it's the largest scam of this type that i'm aware of. >> california taxpayers falling for a scam that's cost victims millions. what you need to know and what's being done to stop it. here's chief investigative reporter. >> thanks for joining us. for the next 30 minutes we investigate exposing government wastes, uncover issues that make a difference, and asking questions that sometime make the powerful uncomfortable. we begin in a major bay area university. it's an issue of conflict and questions at san jose state. an investigation that started with students and faculty calling nbc bay area accusing the university of a cover-up and calling for accountability at the highest levels. toni
was growing up were trained at howard university so it was a natural fit for me to come here. >> where is howard university located? >> at the nation's capital in washington, d.c. on georgia avenue. i like to point that out because i think georgia and florida is the center of the city. you get a little bit of everything on that very corner and i think it represents exactly the cosmopolitan of howard university right now. >> how many students are there? >> about 10,000 students, about 6500 in undergrad and the rest in our graduate programs. >> what was the original creation of howard based on? >> you know, there was a charter back on march 2, 1867 which was founded by ten men to put forward and that charter really spoke to giving opportunity to those who otherwise would not have an opportunity. howard has a hospital on its campus which was known as freedman's hospital and that was back five years before the university. the concept was to allow freed slaves an opportunity to get medical care as they moved from the south to the north but also as the university came about it was again to g
regarding the closure of the university mound ladies home, specifically how the university mound ladies home board intends to ensure that none of the remaining residents will be without caron july 10, 2014. >> great, thank you very much. i know that we have a number of members of the community that are here and we're going to have a brief presentation from a number of folks. but i want to just say that the reason that i called for this hearing is that i believe that what's happening with this institution, with the university mount ladies home, and the fact that the board of directors has given eviction notices and that there are dozens of retirees, many of them, most of them women, that are facing eviction at ages of 80, 90. the fact that that's happening, to me, is symbolic of the larger issue that's happening here in san francisco, which is that our city is changing to the point that i believe we are forgetting what we are about as a city. and the fact that we can evict dozens of elderly women and men, and in so doing, for many of them it's essentially a death sentence to be relocated at t
questions that sometimes make the powerful uncomfortable. we begin at a major bay area university. it's an issue of conflict and questions at san jose state. an investigation that started with students and faculty calling nbc bay area, accusing the university of a cover-up and calling for accountability at the highest levels. tonight, we investigate missing money and questionable decisions. inside this building, inside these classrooms, professors talk about equity, fairness and the principles of justice. this is the justice studies department. was justice served here? >> justice is absolutely not served here. >> she's a professor in the department. >> san jose state university thinks that what happened in our department is done with and justice was served, i openly disagree with them. >> did the university do the right thing here? >> in my eyes, no. >> he's a former staff member. he served as the department coordinator. >> for me it just seems like things got swept under the rug and everything was a-okay. >> the concerns and questions center on former department head dr. mark correia
budget of $250,000 in the current fiscal year to help place residents in university mount to other appropriate placements. it is important to note that we think that though we pay a $50 patch per person per day, it is likely that a larger patch would be required, something along the lines of $80 per person per day in order to find appropriate placementses for all patients. ~ this would result in about $29,200 a year per person placed in an alternative location. we are committed to ensuring that the remaining residents of university mount are placed in appropriate facilities and we'll do what we can to help the organization as it goes out of business to place patients safely. >> thank you very much. i really appreciate the very thorough presentation and all the work that dph has done. and just one thing about the add back, just want to be very clear that none of that money is designated for the board of directors of this institution. it actually follows the residents. it's for them, not for this board of directors given the actionses they have taken. so, why don't we hear now -- tha
. >> cornell university's president says higher education is worths the cost though schools need to be run more efficiently. david skorton weighs in as well on skills training versus traditional education. >> the vast majority of people are making a living doing fine in the country without a very advanced degree. >> the veteran administrator has spoken out nationally on campus suicide prevention. >> one year we had what we call a cluster, a suicide contagion. >> he is not just an ivory league president. he is a cardiologist and a musician. >> i had a chance to sit with billly joel. >> if that's not enough, in 2015, david skorton is set to take over the smithsonian institution, the world's largest museum and research center. not to worry if you are a fan of the black and white bear. >> we are the pandacam. >> i spoke to him at our studios in new york. >> for all of the ills in society and the economy, education, when done well in america is done really, really well. at universities like yours, you are seeing applicants each year more and more from other places who want to come to america because
have committed $6 20,000 to support their relocation, realizing that university mount is probably charging lower than anybody else in san francisco and that they will need let's say a patch such a the city has offered. and we've offered the same level of patch, $1500 a month to assist our residents in finding new homes in san francisco. >> i guess then what's left? sounds like 1.2, 1.5 million left from the sales? >> i think there will be -- after that initial, there will be probably at that point probably $2.5 million left. >> so, my question, then, becomes when you looked at your business model and you said there is going to be a deficit and so forth, and what we're asking is can we at least look at extension so that we could have maybe some more permanent solution, if any? and since you do have over $2 million, why can't we -- why can't you use that to extend the time that people could stay there? >> okay. the reason we do have -- the reason we have the $2 million left over is because of the sale of the building. we don't have it otherwise. we're -- if you look at our balance s
and universities say that these revenues benefit college athletes and their student bodies at large. but i think we have to consider whether the lure of such riches could corrupt the basic mission of athletic programs. winning teams get higher payouts than losing teams which creates a strong incentives to win at any cost. and much of the money is often funneled right back into those sports programs, in the form of multi-million dollar coaching salaries and state of the art facilities - to perpetuate that cycle of winning. i think somewhere in my reading here about $48 million of all of the $900 million that ncaa gets from their broadcasting of march madness and all of the rest a very small portion goes specifically to academics and that is hard to figure because no body has the figures. mr. emmert works there them. they make the decisions. he carries out what they want and i think the subject of discussion is how does he carry out and what powers do you have for carrying out what you think is a good idea. you have been president at three major universities, different places, and i would think your
are ready for and where we are and what can be done. and then there's this great universe where everything is perfect. but it's politics, baby. >>> we will leave this discussion to go to a live discussion of the senate panel looking at college athletes. among the panel is ncaa mark emmert and taylor branch. you can use the #cspanchat. >>> this hearing will come to order. and i want to thank all of you very much for coming here. you're a bit squeezed in there. but, water is on the house so -- be comfortable and be glad. college sports has an absolutely extraordinary position in the culture of our country. not only college sports inspired incredible fan passion all across the country, but they've provided a very important way for young men and women to, as is written, both through athletics, as navigation and get an education. we're going talk about that today. many young people, however, athletics has provided an avenue to college that otherwise would not have existed. and it's important to understand that. college athletes and athletics are rooted in the notion of amateurism. and the histo
, you've got to look at where we are and what can be done, and then there's this great universe where everything is perfect. >> i tend to believe that any metadata is indistinguishable from content in the kind of most proximate kind of scenario that you're discussing, it's not as if you send all of us an e-mail, it's that there are things with no real analog in the telephone context. i might take out a craigslist ad looking for foot fetishes, let's say. craigslist will create an e-mail account corresponding only to that. the fact i take that e-mail address is telling you very specifically what the communication pertains to, because the only purpose for which that e-mail exists is to communicate to that specific ad. there are e-mail addresses that are in themselves a kind of content or action, so i send an e-mail to subscribe at libertarian universalists. that tells you i intend to join a political actions group. if you're interested in following up on that, professor ed felton of princeton wrote a very interesting data to the teen program discussing how in quantity, metadata can, in f
of people coming out to talk to the university mount because i suspect that on july 31st there are going to be people still there and i would wish that there be a more sensitive approach to transfer trauma. individuals do not know where they're going. this is the end of their life. they need, they need to -- they need to have some kind of reassurances. it's not just finding a bed. it's not just finding a roof. it's not just finding board. it's the soul and the heart of each individual and their family members. and that needs to be better addressed in the next two or three weeks. i've asked repeatedly what happens on july 31st. the pressure is on, and no answer is give en. and i'm going to be there on july 31st into august because that's when the crunch starts and i would hope that the place would not close down. >> one quick question. you have interacted with many various institutionses, retirement homes ~. what's your sense of how the university mount has handled this situation? >> well, the closures of nursing homes have not been done very well. the closures of a small mom and pops ove
, including energy efficiency and comfort. students from japan's chiba university took part. many of them worked as volunteers after the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in japan. with disaster-hit areas in mind, the house design was relatively easy and quick to build. they also tried to reduce electricity consumption with lots of insulation. they used building materials to give people the feeling they were living in a ferment structure and not temporary housing. a university team from italy won the competition. the judges appreciated the japanese team's ideas, but they ended the competition in 11th place. the team leader from chiba university showed us the experiment after the announcement. >> translator: i'm satisfied that our japanese university group received high marks in some of the categories. world weather. >>> and that's going to do it for "newsline" at this hour. i'm hiro morita in tokyo. thanks for watching nhk world. j-melo ♪ >>> hello and welcome to "j-melo." the only show that brings japanese music to the world. today we're turning the spotlight on j-music now. we'll be getting
the university [inaudible] was founded at that time in history. it has survived world war i, world war ii, the great depression, and many other recessions, the earthquake of 1906 and other earthquakes. so here we are today, we have a building there, they're doing a good job, taking care of elderly women. this makes no sense to eliminate that site. it should continue as is . so where do i go when i'm old? do i have to go to bakersfield? no, it's too far. do i go to sacramento. that's too far. i want to stay in my neighborhood and live in a house where i'm safe and taken care of and when it's time to die, go to the mounds hospice. we have a hospice there too, you can't forget that. so please consider rezoning this area and keep it as is. thank you. >> thanks, next speaker. >> hello. thank you again for having this hearing, this zoning change resolution. i am jacquelyn, i have lived in the port la since birth. the mound has been a part of my life since i was a little girl growing there to sing christmas carols to the ladies that were there. it is an important part of the neighborhood.
class university in this county. montgomery county is bigger than sex states, and we don't have a university with dormitories, athletic facilities where our best and brightest and the best and brightest around the world can come to be educated of the i want to look into building a four-year university in our county. that's a priority. >> how do you go about doing that? because you rarely hear about that, a world class university develop from the ground up overnight. you see a lot of online schools now around the country. ? we can go to the private sector. i would love to meet with mr. marriott and say mr. marriott, wouldn't it be wonderful to have marriott university, a world class university with your name on it? can you go to the private sector or the public sector. we have montgomery college which is a great school, shady grove institutions of learning. maybe as the incubator to build our university around. but i want to look into that. we should have a four-year university and we don't. we're one of the richest counties in the world. i want to look into that. >> montgomery c
, astro biological and the search for life in the universe. a couple of preliminary announcements, one is ip want to thank c-span for covering this hearing today. that shows the importance of the hearing in a lot of respects and i want to thank the students from herndon high school who are here as well. i understand you had a choice of hearings to attend. in fact, you could attend almost any hearing wanted to and you chose this one because you thought it was the most interesting. and actually, that is one of the purposes of today's hearing. and that is to inspire students today to be the scientists of tomorrow. who knows, we may have some of those scientists in the audience right now who will be inspired by what they hear to study astro biological or perhaps some of the other sciences as well. we appreciate your attendance. i will recognize myself for opening statement and ranking member as well. as we discover more planets around the stars in our own galaxy, it is natural to wonder if we may finally be on the brink of answering the question, are we alone in the universe? finding other
of directors at university mount, that the alternative would be what used to be called a cainsian model where if there is increased business revenue coming in that since philanthropy doesn't work, that there should be some city policy looking at how those revenues can be earmarked for the elderly, either who are moving out of apartment. as far as individuals who are being displaced from buildings that are flipped over, particularly ellis act ones, i think there has to be a major push back on that from the board of supervisors. as an ombudsman specializing in long-term care, i think l tools are available, are ones that i don't necessarily know about. i think we need better eviction protections for individual who are being flipped out because the building is flipped over, because they have nowhere to go. we don't want a homeless population of seniors who have been aging in place in apartments or small four-unit flats that are under the ellis act where the owner says -- and that's a longer discussion. but i think that because the placements in nursing home have diminished and the placements, aff
at howard university. commemorating the 50th anniversary of the signing of the civil rights act. that law was signed by president lyndon johnson on july 2 1964. it outlined discrimination based on race, sex, national origin. andrewpeakers included young. this is just under an hour. welcome interim president of howard university, dr. frederick. [applause] celebrating the 50th anniversary of the civil rights act of 1964. it is an honor to join the department of justice in hosting this symposium. pleasure to acknowledge the inventive visuals -- dan individuals. those whom we are honored to have in our program today, attorney general holder, secretary perez, and secretary young. white house officials, members of congress, other elected federal agencies today, leaders the call for comprehensive civil rights legislation gave momentum in 1963 as civil rights activists continued to organize peaceful demonstrations throughout the country. of the nonviolent protesters met in birmingham, alabama, the president delivered a speech voicing support for comprehensive civil rights legislation. thesepresid
. and shibley telhami, the anwar sadat professor of peace and development at the university of maryland, senior fellow at the brookings institution and author of the book, "the world through arab eyes." we thank you both. women come back to the "newshour". what do you think has set off the latest round of violence? >> i think it was connected to the kidnappings of the three israeli teenagers. israel has held hamas responsible for that and you began to see the beginnings of this process of tit for tat after that. now you have the revenge killing, which if we heard from the report, has created a shock wave in israel, but takes place against the backdrop of increasing tension between hamas and gaza. they don't want to look like they're backing down. hamas vows revenge because, you know, eight of their operatives were killed last night, and they sense that there's an urgency on the part of israelis to come in on the ground and it's almost as if they're testing the israels to see how far they go but they don't want to go too far because if they really provoke the israelis to come in on the ground th
. >> next, former home land security secretary and current university of california system president janet napolitano speaks about issues facing the nation's higher education system from the education commission of the state's conference this 1 hour and 15 minutes. >> good afternoon. welcome it the 49th annual education commission of the state's national forum. i'm jeremy anderson president of the ecs. it is such an honor to have so many of you with us here today in washington d.c. looking at the room and how the attendance has grown, it's great to know that we have a registration that is the secondesecond highest which shows the growth of ecs. >> over the next three days our conversations and dialogue will be covered with education policy and what we can do best for the states. that's the very nature of what ecs brings to you. i urge you to take advantage of the many education leaders that are here. governors, lieutenant-governors, chiefs, legislatures, board members, teachers of the year, so we together can share the education policies that can help us most in the states that we serve. t
not understood] residing at university mound ladies home. i'm here because [speaker not understood] already spoken to the trauma that's going to happen to the seniors if they're forced to move. i want to spend a few moments talk about the trauma for our caregivers. [speaker not understood]. we found we were unable to take care of them. as a single child, i'm one of those people [speaker not understood] about the trauma again we have to go through the same process. i have a bunch of notes. i need to throw it away. what i really want to say is i worked for 25 years in a community health center. our whole model is predicated on the majority of [speaker not understood] coming from patient subsidized by either federal, state, or private grants. why this home can't continue to operate under the same model is beyond me. we have not been given a lot of information by the trustees or by [speaker not understood]. one of the thing we learned is it is a $400,000 deficit. pretty much for the last 20, 30 years. you know that as supervisors and funders and foundations and government people, that's a drop
the feeling they were living in a permanent is structure and not temporary housing. [ applause ] a university team from italy won the competition. the judges appreciated the japanese team's ideas, but they ended in 11th place. the team leader spoke after the announcement. >> translator: i'm satisfied that our japanese university group received high marks in some of the categories. >> they added their architectural design that was influenced by japan and got a high evaluation. >>> now let's check out the world weather. >>> and that's going to do it for "newsline" at this hour. thanks for watching nhk world.
university paid her $275,000 for a speech in october last year. thousands of members and students listened to her speak for an hour, and the contract reveals the lengths of controlling the setting from the type of tell prompter to the sets, sceneries, and approval of the moderator and pays a stenographer $1,000. no state funded money paid for the speech, but came from ticket sales and endowments. others protested the speaking fee. at unlb say clinton should donate all or some of the contract back to the university. now, this brings us to the twitter question this morning. when we look at the numbers and get more of the specifics, are hillary clinton speaking fees too much for a public university to pay out or do you get what you pay for? there's only one hrc, and that's what you're getting. produce answers using hashtag way too early, and we'll give you the answers later on in the show. jennifer, a shoutout for you. defending plans to take a family vacation to italy although the pending railroad strike is three days away. unions and the transportation authority were talking through the nig
for these tights and watch for the authors in the near future on booktv.org. >> pepperdine university's angela hawken sat down with booktv to asks the pros and cons of marijuana legalization. this interview recorded at pepperdine university in malibu, california, is part of booktv's college series. ... >> the problem with the issues of mounding marijuana there is an advocacy group sobel side so the public has no direct -- no idea what direction they're pulled in on but the issue of legalization to agree on the facts. >> host: garett use the of personally? >> guest: i was hoping you would ask that. each author was required to publicly declare their position on the subject. that is uncomfortable because you don't want to show your hand when doing research to not be biased with the perspective but in this case we were asked. i was in support of the commercial legalization. >> host: why are you in favor? >> guest: as i noted my drug of choice and refers to the drink of wind when i was 13 during communion. and then say save consumer of wind so my drug of choice is alcohol. the social harms of alcoh
is on vacation at pepperdine university. >> host: you are watching booktv nazis been to of location malibu california at pepperdine university we like to visit universities and colleges to talk to professors who were also offers. we're talking to the author of "igods" here is the book cover but before we get into that what duties jeopardized? >> i am a film maker first so i teach his screenwriting, of production in helping to navigate the entertainment industry. >> host: also a director for the center for its entertainment is part of your professorship? >> a think tank how media and culture impact each other of bull's-eyes hall film and shapes the public conversation to figure out the greater good. talk about christianity and culture? >> as a theologian i have always been interested in how religious feelings are transmitted across culture i have been moved by moving pictures so a this is in a chance with that small screen takes over the big screen. >> host: but also with a jet? train wreck that's right. by lookit these companies that have overtaken our lives whether apple or google or face
spoke at a ceremony at howard university commemorating the 50th anniversary of the signing of the civil rights act. it was signed by president lyndon johnson on july 2, 1964. outlaweded -- discrimination. this is just under one hour. >> please welcome interim president of howard university, dr. wayne a. i. frederick. [applause] >> welcome. it is with great pride i welcome sur distinguished guest celebrating the 50th anniversary of the civil rights act of 1964. it is an honor to join the department of justice in hosting this symposium. it is my pleasure to acknowledge the following individuals. those whom we are honored to have in our program today, attorney general holder, secretary perez, and secretary duncan. white house officials, members of congress, other elected officials, federal agencies represented today, leaders and stakeholders from the civil rights community, national archives for the civil rights act, and the distinguished members of the howard university community faculty students, staff, and alumni. the call for comprehensive civil rights legislation gave momentum in 1963
on in. >> kyoto university professor tim stewart has spent the last two colleges in he's originally from canada he's been closely watching t recent changes happening in country. japan has been trying to cha its english language curricu and they've come up with a blue what parts of it will work a what >> i guess we have to give k tohe pushing change reform. reform is get a good experience from elemen chance that they'll enjoy learni >> stewart believes it's a g thing learning languages at a youn age. currently most japanese stud study english for at least e years school. but stewart finds many hav difficulty communicating out their native tongue. >> their reading skills and fo the most part their writing skills are outstanding. but yeah, listening, they're held back. we have an activity where students something or sharing some informat and sometimes students will respon >> stewart also sees a probl with system. universities look at score written tests and where stud rank i english communication skills aren't tested. interviews and lette by applicants don't play a rol in stewart blames thi
and voter i.d. laws. a divided congress struggles to address the border crisis. colleges and universities push back on legislation to combat sexual assualts on campus. are israel and hamas abiding by the laws of war? and a colorado town picks itself up after a flood, by playing bluegrass. >> ifill: from voting rights to border control to the death penalty. the department of justice holds the reins on any number of critical issues central to the national debate. i sat down with attorney general eric holder the justice department today to talk about some of them. thank you for joining us, mr. attorney general. as the nation's chief law enforcement officer, you watched yesterday as the house voted to give the speaker the right to sue the president. what were you thinking when you saw that happen? >> well, i thought i was witnessing something that was more political than legal. there's not much to that lawsuit. this is something that i would be surprised if a court finds that there is standing, and i certainly don't expect that, at the end of the day, the plaintiffs will win that case, and i
. that was a pretty big deal when the fda approved a study at the university of arizona looking at marijuana as a possible treatment for veterans with posttramatic stress. but, you know, this week the professor who was launching that trial was let go by the university. sue sicily had been an associate professor in the college of medicine more than seven years and she thinks the move came down to politics. thanks for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> are you doing all right? >> yes, we sure are. we're going to persevere, believe me. >> it's a jarring time for you. >> oh, it's so demoralizing because this is work we've been fighting for for over four years now and the veterans have actually been standing shoulder to shoulder with us pushing to get this work implemented and to have it cut off at the knees like this is so disheartening. >> i want to talk specifically about the study because as you know it's something we report on a lot. but let me ask what's going on with you and the university. they say, look, this is not out of the ordinary. we make these decisions all the time and no
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